42 Comments

  1. There are a lot of people with a lack of self criticism and they tend to be the most self righteous idiots around.

    Sadly, self absorbed idiots never improve, nor do they ever change because they cannot learn from their mistakes without any form of self criticism.

    If you have self criticism, it only means you are a brilliant person. Whenever you feel doubtful in yourself, just take a brave leap of faith, and if you ever end up doing something wrong at least you'll know what you have done and will grow as a person.

    After all, making mistakes is how we learn. However, those that are blind to their mistakes are doomed to repeat them.

    When your self criticism comes knocking on your door it's just there telling you to learn from something and it's okay to take your own criticism, as our own criticism can be constructive, but know when you are being too critical of yourself because letting overly critical criticism take over you isn't healthy.

    Best wishes to anyone trying to overcome their self criticism, and remember if it's trying to silence you just slap some reigns on it and take that leap of faith because a bad scenario probably isn't going to be as bad as your hypothetical critical thinking.

    Face your fears, become strong, and soon enough your self criticism will be nothing more than a helpful pet. A good inner constructive critic, once you show it who's in charge. Train your brain!

  2. Einstein's first wife helped him write his seminal papers. When two brains are working on a problem, it's hard not to be called a genius. She did all of his calculations and co-wrote his papers.

  3. I am confused. Maybe I want to believe I have imposter syndrome so I can indirectly stamp that I am a genius or just very intelligent. But I know I am not. I show typical average skills whenever I am in group projects in my class or something like that. But then I also feel I dont deserve it. But I also feel that I deserve better. Idk.

  4. I'm crying like a little kid right now. I didn't understand what imposter syndrome meant until just now. I feel so validated. I feel so much less alone. I'm so glad I'm not abnormal and that it's common and it's okay. Thank you for making this.

  5. Does it also count as imposter syndrome when you keep getting very good grades in school despite feeling like you don't put in much (if any) effort at all, yet you're still afraid you might fail? Feel like you've been blessed with high intelligence that you don't need for the career you want to pursue, as if you're throwing away something someone else would kill for?

    My best friend struggles a lot with school and frequently scores badly on tests, despite pouring hours of her life into studying the material, all while I sat down for maybe one or two hours I got a great mark. I always feel really bad when it happens and I don't really know how to respond. Sometimes I feel like she despises me when it comes to that. I wouldn't say she sees green with envy, but just a violent sadness that whatever she does, she hardly gets anything satisfactory in return.

    I feel like the fear of failing myself might be a combination between a subconscious reaction to the fruitless struggles I watch my friend go through and my parents expecting the best from me – more than ever since I went down a level in order to drop math (which I gladly wasn't good at, otherwise this whole feeling would probably have been 10 times worse).

    I honestly didn't even know this existed until I saw this video. Here I was thinking it was just my weird mind dreaming up invalid insecurities!

  6. Notice this studies the people who didnt get the result they want
    Studying what doesnt work and talking about it in a way known to create what it talks about.. good luck!

  7. Sometimes I feel like an imposter, but I'm afraid to admit that I'm wrong because then it means I think I'm talented or something. So then I seem conceited. Also, recognizing that you actually do have some skill is scary because it sets you up for disappointment.

  8. Share this far and wide! When I mentioned this to someone in work then said "OMG, me too. I feel like the dumbest person in the room, every single day" – this guy is incredibly smart! I just sent him a link to this.

    In general, we all just need to be better at talking to each other and not being so guarded.

  9. Oh, my god. I've always felt this. I always feel like everything I achieve is some kind of error in the system. Every time I get a good grade, or get a part in a play, I always think I didn't actually deserve it. Every time someone claps after I've talked or acted, I think they're making fun of me. Whenever people compliment me, I think they're lying. I know it's not like that, but I can't help feeling like that…. I've always been the smart kid of the class, and I have this overwhelming fear that one day people will find out that I am, in fact, not smart at all.

  10. For many years I constantly had this way of thinking: that I couldn’t do anything. I’ve always enjoyed the arts like music and painting and just creating in general, but I never saw myself as very good no matter what I did. Whenever someone wouldn’t compliment what I did, I asked for critiquing, but when they complimented me, I fought them on it. There’s always room for improvement I though (and still think this, it’s not a totally bad thing). There was a point though that this was really getting to me, like I had diminished myself so much I refused to think of myself as ever good at anything again. It wasn’t until one day, while feeling sad, I watched a YouTube video (JaidenAnimations) and she was talking about how a topic like this with self worth and how hard you should and can work, and she brought up the term imposter syndrome in the video which I’d never heard before, but it gave me a big wake up call. It really does help just putting a name to something, and lately I’ve been working a lot more on my self confidence and it’s really been helping! Thank you so much Jaiden and TedEd for this bit of light on the situation!

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